Drawing the Line

imageIt’s an ongoing Tug of War…on one end of the rope is me, the teacher.  (I’m supposed to win, right?). On the other end, six of my students.  The battle?

Pokemon.

Or, to be more specific, the right to spend time drawing Pokemon.  Lots of Pokemon.  Page after page after page of Pokemon.  To be honest, they are great pictures.  These kids are talented!  Clearly, they have honed their skills by spending lots of effort and practice.  And they wish to continue doing this All. Day. Long.

They are subversive Pokemon drawers.  They love drawing these little critters so much that they will resort to any means to get away with grabbing some Pokemon time.  Math test?  Decorated with Pikachu and Bulbasaur.  Write your reading goal on a bookmark?  The flip side has Blastoise and Venonat.  But the true battle comes during Writing Workshop.

So many Pokemon books.  Pokemon Small Moments.  Informational books on How to Catch Pokemon.  Lists and lists of Pokemon in their Heart Map Journals.  Any reason for writing can be turned into an opportunity to write about Pokemon…which then can be ILLUSTRATED.  (Writing time, 5-10 minutes; illustrating time, much more).

See what I’m up against?

As the tug of war continues, I’ve found new ways to encourage (insist on) more varied topics for writing.  I’ve read mentor text after mentor text which do NOT contain any Pokemon.  And their writing has flourished.  They do enjoy writing, and have grown immensely as authors.  But underneath it all, there is the constant temptation…please, let us draw Pokemon!

And they’ve gotten very good at asking delightful questions that hide their true motives!

“Could I please write my own graphic novel?”  (Code..draw Pokemon).                   “Could I please get some buddy feedback on my story?” (Code…go over to the corner and draw Pokemon).                                                                                                                     “Could I do a story map and then add my words?” (Code…you get the idea).

Imagine my dismay at the beginning of the Persuasive Writing unit.  I knew it was only a matter of time before their campaign began, and today I found the first note of what I am sure will be many on my desk…

image

 

Advertisements

5 comments

  1. jennieb · March 10

    I love so many things about this post!
    This: “Could I please write my own graphic novel?” (Code..draw Pokemon).
    “Could I please get some buddy feedback on my story?” (Code…go over to the corner and draw Pokemon). “Could I do a story map and then add my words?” (Code…you get the idea).
    And the picture of the note from your student – to name a few. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

  2. jsementelli · March 10

    This was so cute! I too have students who like to draw certain thing- one is obsessed with the movie trolls and draws/writes about it almost every day!!

    Like

  3. Embekka · March 10

    This was hilarious!! I can totally see this unfolding in the classroom. I love the analogy of tug-o-war. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  4. teachworkoutlove · March 10

    Lollll love the decoding what that really means of what the kids were saying !

    Like

  5. franmcveigh · March 13

    Love the two reasons: “drawing is good for kids’ imaginations and kids like it”. Can’t wait to see their arguments progress as their skills increase!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s